Epilogue – Part 4

The Fourth installment of Joan Stansbury’s poem, inspired by a visit to Macbeth.

 

Epilogue

 

THE P.E. TEACHER

 

(taking down a whistle from a hook in the wall)

 

Fit and lean, they worked well as a team.

Planned and executed each exercise

with care and precision. Breathing well controlled.

Gestures economical. Disciplined.

None of that hugging, showing off nonsense,

although they pleased the crowd well enough.

Concentration excellent. Great performance.

 

Memo to self: try five-a-side next term!

 

Epilogue – Part 3

Part Three of Joan Stansbury’s Poem…

 

Epilogue

THE FASHION WRITER

(looping a cashmir scarf in this year’s style)

 

The costumes were grey and mean:

altogether spartan.

 

Accessorised by bloody braces

or gory glove

in garish red that no one with taste

could begin to love.

 

At least they avoided jeans

and the horror of tartan.

Epilogue – Part 2

Below is the second Poem in Joan’s series of 5 entitled Epilogue.  A snapshot of our time in the crypt and most importantly the people who may stepped into our underground world for a few fleeting hours……. Today: The Birdwatcher.

[In October – November 2011 Baz Productions put on Macbeth in the crypt of St Andrew Holborn with a cast of just five multi-tasking actors.]

EPILOGUE

 

After a performance of the Baz Macbeth five members of the audience gather up their props and reflect on the evening’s experience.

THE BIRDWATCHER

(slips binoculars off a hook on the wall)

 

Most of them are unobservant:

they see the birds they want to see.

Banquo, to flatter Duncan’s fervent

desire for ease and tranquillity

after the savagery of war,

points to martins that swoop and soar

as signs of summer’s sweetest breath

and healthful air. But night brings death.

 

 

Macbeth imbues loon and goose

with folly and fear: unjust abuse

of birds devoted to partner and chicks.

Not for them power politics.

Obsessed with corvids, Macbeth knows

you rarely find dead rooks or crows

or choughs or magpies, so he strives

to emulate their charmed lives.

 

 

Macduff’s wife knows her birds.

The wren, she says, will fight to save

her fledglings from the owl. But words

and wit for weapons aren’t enough

to defend the life of Lady Macduff.

Her scolding song, wren-brave,

assaults in vain deafened ears:

we struggle to hold back our tears.

 

 

Male wrens build several nests:

the females choose the cosiest.

Sir Christopher Wren built churches galore:

Baz chose this as appropriate for

a wintry play in chilly weather.

Companionably we huddle together.

The record for wrens is sixty-three

in one small box. How many are we?

Epilogue

As we reflect over Macbeth and pack up our wares, count the pennies, dismantle the lights, evaluate the show, dream up the next step and get some well-earned rest, our lovely Poet in Residence, Joan Stansbury, was analysing the results in a far more imaginative way.

Below is the first Poem in her series of 5 entitled Epilogue.  We’ll be releasing one twice a week in the run-up to Christmas – a snapshot of our time in the crypt and most importantly the people who stepped into our underground world for a few fleeting hours…….

[In October – November 2011 Baz Productions put on Macbeth in the crypt of St Andrew Holborn with a cast of just five multi-tasking actors.]

EPILOGUE

 

After a performance of the Baz Macbeth five members of the audience gather up their props and reflect on the evening’s experience.

THE HISTORIAN

(pats pocket to check that white cotton gloves are safe)

We clamber down a steep and tumbling stair 

to a curvilinear crypt with bellying tunnels

of seventeenth-century brickwork, picturing there

another London cellar with powder barrels

pregnant with death for James, Banquo’s heir.

 

 That treachery betrayed and bomb aborted

became the exploding gossip of the day.

Arguments from the trial, widely reported,

 informed the architecture of this play.

Equivocation: as wicked as a lie? 

Conscience: a true guide in everything?

Can good men justly use deceit, or spy?

Is it ever right to kill an anointed king?

Tomorrow and tomorrow and tomorrow

must we repeat the crimes of yesterday?

 

by Joan Stansbury

Day 31: Some beautiful photographs taken by our audience

Day 30 – Acting and sport: Joely Richardson

In this Woman’s Hour interview, Joely Richardson talks about her mother, her role in new film Anonymous, and most BAZ-specifically, the link between acting and sport!

The interview starts about 30 minutes in.

Day 29 – A review… ish

Feedback is a funny thing. Write it down and print it and its a review. Hear it spoken directly to you and you must consider the source – are they being nice to protect my feelings? What do they really think? Do they feel like they need to say something ‘clever’ when actually an abstract or off-the-wall observation would be equally useful?

Overhear a reaction by accident and you get something different again, like when one of our team’s acute hearing picked up possibly some of the loveliest comments we’ve had so far from a couple of audience members  the other night. A open mind, an honest reaction and the odd comparison to long-running sci-fi TV series is all BAZ needs to feel like it was worth it.

Audience:

(About the witches with umbilical cords) “It’s just like Doctor Who!”
(Enthusiastically, on being asked to move to the next bay) “It’s like we’re in the Crystal Maze!”
(After the show) “I can’t believe there was only five of them. I kept expecting more to come out at the curtain call, I couldn’t understand where they were.”

Day 28 – A Review…

So here is what someone thought of Macbeth, someone who writes reviews of things, and publishes them. A critic, I think they’re called…

http://www.britishtheatreguide.info/reviews/macbethbaz-rev.htm

 

Day 27 – Award nominations for Macbeth at the Crypt!

News just in…

The Off west End Theatre Awards have nominated us for an ‘Offie’ in four categories!!

Best Ensemble
Baz Productions for Macbeth at the Crypt of St Andrew

Best Production
Macbeth at the Crypt of St Andrew

Best Director
Sarah Bedi for Macbeth at the Crypt of St Andrew

Best Sound Designer
Carl Prekopp for Macbeth at the Crypt of St Andrew

Day 25 – Sneaky footage of eerie lighting during 3rd performance of Macbeth

http://www.youtube.com/user/micheese?feature=mhee#p/a/u/0/mKsGy34QbOc